Tuesday, March 11, 2014

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BTR EMPLOYEES PICK: ECLECTIC STYLE

Employee Pick Eclectic

MILAN AND PARIS FASHION WEEK 2014


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Photo Source:  Beyond the rack

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ABOUT BEYOND THE RACK
It's time to go beyond shopping

Beyond the Rack is a private shopping club for women and men who want designer brand apparel and accessories at prices up to 80% off retail. They obtain authentic designer merchandise and provide it exclusively to our members through limited-time events. Each event starts at a specific time and typically lasts only 48 hours. After each event ends the merchandise is no longer available. Members are notified by email in advance of each upcoming event according to their preferences.
Membership has its privileges!
There are three ways to join Beyond the Rack:
  1. You can be invited by a friend who is already a member
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  1. You can request a membership

From time-to-time, they need to restrict the number of new members that they add to the Club, which can cause a delay in our accepting a request or invitation to join. They do this in order to ensure that all their members have adequate access to the merchandise in our events.
Limited time, limited quantities
Due to the exclusive nature of the merchandise in their events, quantities are often limited and certain styles may only be available in a narrow range of sizes. To take advantage of the broadest possible selection, they recommend that you come to the events early (soon after they open) and shop quickly. To ensure that all members have an equal opportunity to get the items they want, they also limit the amount of time an item can stay in your shopping bag.
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Monday, March 10, 2014

Surprise: Under Obamacare, States Can Seize Assets to Recoup Medicaid Expenses









Obamacare is just full of surprises, as more Americans are beginning to realize now that the law has been fully implemented.
If you’ve followed news about the Affordable Care Act, you know that the law dramatically expands Medicaid coverage by raising the qualifying income level to include tens of millions of Americans who, before Obamacare, made too much money to qualify; this is part of the massive wealth-transfer aspect of the law.
It turns out that there is much more wealth transfer taking place than previously believed, as reported by Fox News:
Tom Gialanella, 56, was shocked to find out he qualified for Medicaid under ObamaCare. The Bothell, Wash., resident had been able to retire early years ago, owns his home outright in a pricey Seattle suburb and is living off his investments.
He wanted no part of the government’s so-called free health care. “It’s supposed to be a safety net program. It’s not supposed to be for someone who has assets who can pay the bill,” he said.
And after reading the fine print, Gialanella had another reason to flee Medicaid — the potential death debt.
Expanded coverage will lead to expanded fiscal confiscation
Most Americans don’t realize it – because the government sure as heck isn’t telling anyone – but under Obamacare, states are allowed to recover the cost of healthcare from someone enrolled in Medicaid under provisions of the Affordable Care Act after they die by seizing their assets. It’s true.



Surprise: Under Obamacare, States Can Seize Assets to Recoup Medicaid Expenses

Surprise: Under Obamacare, States Can Seize Assets to Recoup Medicaid Expenses

Obamacare is just full of surprises, as more Americans are beginning to realize now that the law has been fully implemented.
If you’ve followed news about the Affordable Care Act, you know that the law dramatically expands Medicaid coverage by raising the qualifying income level to include tens of millions of Americans who, before Obamacare, made too much money to qualify; this is part of the massive wealth-transfer aspect of the law.
It turns out that there is much more wealth transfer taking place than previously believed, as reported by Fox News:
Tom Gialanella, 56, was shocked to find out he qualified for Medicaid under ObamaCare. The Bothell, Wash., resident had been able to retire early years ago, owns his home outright in a pricey Seattle suburb and is living off his investments.He wanted no part of the government’s so-called free health care. “It’s supposed to be a safety net program. It’s not supposed to be for someone who has assets who can pay the bill,” he said.
And after reading the fine print, Gialanella had another reason to flee Medicaid — the potential death debt.
Expanded coverage will lead to expanded fiscal confiscationMost Americans don’t realize it – because the government sure as heck isn’t telling anyone – but under Obamacare, states are allowed to recover the cost of healthcare from someone enrolled in Medicaid under provisions of the Affordable Care Act after they die by seizing their assets. It’s true.




Click To Read More:  Surprise: Under Obamacare, States Can Seize Assets to Recoup Medicaid Expenses

Surprise: Under Obamacare, States Can Seize Assets to Recoup Medicaid Expenses

Surprise: Under Obamacare, States Can Seize Assets to Recoup Medicaid Expenses

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Monday, March 3, 2014

Sunday, March 2, 2014

'Consumers actually being informed might put car dealers out of business'


Photo Source:  http://consumermediallc.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/usedcarsalesman.jpg



Oh No! Car Dealers Might Have To Deal With Informed Customers! That Must Be Illegal!

from the felony-interference-of-a-business-model dept

A few folks sent over this recent NY Times article about how the traditional auto sales world was apparently up in arms about a company called TrueCar ( http://blog.truecar.com/ )that seeks to make the process of buying cars easier by providing more info to buyers about what cars are actually selling for, what the dealers' true prices are, and also offering guaranteed "haggle free" prices from certain dealers. To be honest, this really doesn't sound all that different from a few other services online. The last two times I've bought cars, I've been able to get good deals using online services like this and just emailing directly to dealers (and for anyone buying a car, I can't recommend CarBuyingTips.com enough, even with its 90's era web design -- that site has saved me a ton). 
However, what's really incredible is how the industry has reacted to this site -- basically freaking out and whining about how consumers actually being informed might put them all out of business. The excuses are typical of what you'll find with an industry that works on a collusion or gatekeeper system when it's finally faced with real competition. They start talking about how real competition is evil and how it will lead to a worse situation with more scams. In fact, TrueCar got hit with claims that what it was doing, in providing consumers with more info, was illegal. They've even had to change their practices in some states -- which really only goes to show just how much car dealers have influenced various state laws in their favor to protect against true competition and an informed consumer.
Think of just how convoluted and insane this argument is. Honda doesn't want informed consumers because (wait for it...) informed consumers might lead dealers to try to trick buyers. 
Others, including Honda, have argued that TrueCar could open the door to unscrupulous dealers trying to sell a more expensive car or more options once they get the customers in the door — which Honda said reflected poorly on the brand. Honda also threatened to cut off marketing dollars to dealers who promoted its cars on the site below the invoice price, a price that is supposed to represent something close to the dealer’s cost (though dealers usually make more money on other manufacturer incentives and programs).


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